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Scripture

"Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ" (St. Jerome). Don't live this way, don't die this way. There are many ways to get at least 10 minutes of Bible reading a day.

Resources to Assist in Daily Reading

It's not the average person's calling to become a Biblical scholar, but no literate Catholic is exempt from reading the Good Book cover-to-cover and having an understanding of Salvation History.

Douay-Rheims Version

No, it's not impossible to understand. No, KJV is not better and did not come first. Just dive into the Douay-Rheims and don't look back. LibriVox and YouTube offer plenty of recordings if that's more to your liking. PRO-TIP: reading old Catholic books can help you get used to the "archaic" language because these books often quote from the DRV.

Mass Readings

Masses always have one Epistle or Lesson (at least) and one Gospel reading. On top of that, the Propers usually come from Scripture, too. One caveat: the readings for some weekdays are simply repeats of Sunday. Just be aware of that if you base your reading plan off of this.

Prepared Reading Plans

This page has great examples for different levels of readers, all with the end of reading the whole Bible in a year. Unfortunately, the Advanced plan based on Matins is only available for those with Scribd subscriptions.

Custom Reading Plan

The Catena Bible app, built by Orthodox Christians, has a lot of great options for reading the DRV with the Catena Aurea and an assortment of other commentaries. If you create an account with the mobile app, you can also curate your own Bible reading plan (Bible in a year, Gospels in four months, NT or OT in six months, etc.).

Commentaries

Although the footnotes by Challoner in the DRV are nothing to shake a tail feather at, sometimes some added expertise is in order. A popular collection, though it only covers the Gospels, is the Catena Aurea compiled by St. Thomas Aquinas. Another revered commentary, though not completely translated into English, is that of Cornelius à Lapide. But for most serious readers, the go-to is Haydock.

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